21 Acres- Class this Thursday, the 12th

Hi all-

We are very excited to be teaming up with 21 Acres in Woodinville Washington to be teaching a class this Thursday, the 12th, entitled “Every Bite: Preparing a Sustainable Holiday Feast” (6:30-8:30). The class will include recipes and ideas as to what to do with your extra food at the holidays. We would love to hear any things you do with your leftovers that we can pass along!

21 Acres is an organic, sustainable agricultural center, aimed at promoting clean, healthy eating. Situated on 21 acres in the Woodinville valley, 3 acres contain the building facilities (for cooking classes, farmers’ market, offices, and event rental space), and the back 18 utilize the principles found in permaculture. Take a look at their website and all they have to offer:
21 Acres

And here is a great video from their site about them:

Hope to see you Thursday at 21 Acres!

C&K

Great Every Bite tip from Marci (Making Preserved Lemons)

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A few weekends ago, Every Bite participated in the inaugural Terry Avenue Saturday Market in the South Lake Union neighborhood of Seattle. We had someone stop by our tent, Marci, who gave us a great tip we wanted to share with you:

She said she uses lemons often (in water, recipes, etc.) and instead of composting the lemons, she puts them, cut side up, in a mason jar and sprinkles with kosher salt (couple of teaspoons). Then you can just seal up and leave on the kitchen counter. They are fine to leave on the counter because they are preserved, and nothing will grow in that environment, but if you would like to keep them in the refrigerator, they will keep for a year.

Then, just keep adding the lemons and salt on top until filled and let rest for a month before you start using them. Once you do you them, it’s the rind (not the juice or pulp) that is used in dishes. Just rinse off, peel away the rind and use in a variety of dishes, including grain salads, salad dressings, stews, pasta dishes, or, as Marci said she liked to do, just eat them straight out of the jar! So easy to make and so delicious!

Thanks for sharing Marci and feel free to respond to this post sharing other ideas and uses for preserved lemons!

C&K

 

Brand New Farmers Market-SLU area of Seattle!

We are very excited and honored to participate in the inaugural year of the Terry Avenue Saturday Market (“TASM”) in the South Lake Union area of downtown Seattle! It will be from 10 am to 3 pm every Saturday from now until September. This is great to have a new farmers market for this area of town.

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TASM

Here is a link to a great article about the new market:
TASM-recent article

And an exerpt from their facebook page:
“From the organizers of the Ballard Farmers Market and the Fremont Sunday Market, comes our latest sister market along the old brick streets of Terry Avenue with over 40 local vendors weekly.”

 

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We would love to see you there on Saturday to support local farmers and Every Bite!

xo
C & K

6,000 lbs of food on 1/10th an acre!

This is the coolest house EVER! You have to check out the link below about the Dervaes family who, living about 15 minutes outside of downtown Los Angeles, grow 6,000 lbs of food a year on 1/10th of an acre. Their story and all they are able to accomplish is amazing and inspiring:

http://diycozyhome.com/6000-lbs-of-food/

Dervaes House

http://www.urbanhomesteadsupply.com/

And with Easter only 2 Sundays away, we wanted to share this creative and sustainable way of decorating your table, with the coolest Easter napkin rings (from Martha Stewart). These are just the coolest things!
http://www.marthastewart.com/1107000/sustainable-diy-easter-napkin-rings

 

Enjoy Every Bite,
C & K

Recent “Pioneer Woman” (and a very Every Bite) episode!

I saw a great episode last week on “The Pioneer Woman” on the Food Network. It was called “One Thing Leads to Another.” Ree starts the episode out by making a big pot of black beans, which in and of themselves look delicious. Then, she shows several different recipes using some of the leftover beans; including a taco pizza, grilled veggie burritos, and a black bean burger.
That’s exactly the thought (and layout of the chapters) of Every Bite and doing something along these lines gives us a great idea for a new chapter in Every Bite Part 2!
What a great episode and a great way to use up leftovers. And in several delicious ways!
Enjoy every bite!
xo
C

 

“Women Stars of Food & Wine”- Downtown Seattle

On Sunday, February 8th, we were honored to take part in the 2nd Annual “Women Stars of Food & Wine” event. Organized by the Women’s Funding Alliance, a local group that aims to champion causes and to provide leadership for the lives of women and girls in Washington state, it was held on the 73rd and 74th (or maybe it was the 74th and 75th!) floors of the Columbia Center in downtown Seattle. The event paired up amuse-bouches from women chefs with wines from local women sommeliers. We served small salmon cakes with vegetable salsa from the cookbook, and we were paired with SuLei Cellars out of Walla Walla (link below). They poured their delicious 2013 Sauvignon Blanc, their 2012 Dena Rae Tuscan style blend and their 2011 Roller Girl Jammer Red.

Karen did a wonderful job making up 300 mini salmon cakes and they were dee-licious. We recognized people coming back for seconds! They were apparently quite popular!

It was an amazing opportunity to showcase Every Bite and as women, we were so thrilled to meet other women chefs, sommeliers, and entrepreneurs, as well as supporting the wonderful mission of the WFA. The facility was beyond cool, and is chance you’re not going to come across too often. It’s an incredible view of the city.
I (Carol) had never been to the top of the Columbia Center, and when I told a good friend of mine about the event, she said “oh they have the best women’s bathroom in all of Seattle. I was there for something about 15 years ago, and the thing I remember most was the incredible bathroom!” When I told Karen, she was like “heck yea it is!” So pardon the fact that there is a picture of the bathroom below- I just couldn’t help it! It was quite the view for sure!!

Many thanks to Tosh from WFA for contacting us in the first place and to David from Seattle Uncorked. They put on a great event and we look forward to next year!

 

 

Dive: a Greenwood Meaningful Movie Event

Last week, we participated in a great event in the Greenwood neighborhood of Seattle, called “Meaningful Movies.” As the name states, these are movies shown that really mean something and try to bring a message or theme to our attention, so that we can then discuss together what we can do to help.

The movie is called “Dive”  (link below) and it is about a group of people who “dumpster dive” in the trash bins in LA-area supermarkets. After the film, we sat around and talked about what we could each do to reduce food waste; sharing a multitude of tips, information, and stories.

Here are a couple of notes/quotes we jotted down from the film that we wanted to share here with you:
We waste 3000 lbs of food a second.
“50% of food that’s grown up and is ready to be harvested never makes it to someone’s stomach.”
Of all the food waste going on, about 40% is in the households.
“Food is life. And it should never be wasted. Food is precious.”

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Movie Setup.

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Our table (complete with our new Ibook version on the left)!

 

Another interesting thing we found out during the movie/disscussion, was that Albertson’s was the first supermarket chain (and one of the firsts) to participate in a “Food Rescue” program. This program has now grown to include such giants as Walmart, SamsClub, and Target. This is a huge step forward in having food that they are going to throw out anyway (that is perfectly good) go to someone who really needs it. Way to go Albertson’s!

http://feedoc.org/HowWeWork/FoodPrograms/GroceryAndFoodRescue.aspx

We also met some great people from Seattle Tilth and Food not Bombs. Great groups and really nice people. We SOO want to take the Master Composter class!

http://www.amazon.com/Dive-Darren-Hoffman/dp/B00NK9JFI6/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1422411610&sr=8-4&keywords=dive+film

http://www.seattletilth.org/

http://foodnotbombs.net/

It was a very thought provoking, interesting event and we look forward to doing something like that again soon!

C&K

Recent Food/Farming Documentaries

On the plane over the Christmas holidays, I watched two food themed documentaries: “In Organic We Trust” and “Ingredients.” I found both to be very interesting and while both focused on food and farming, I enjoyed them in different ways. One difference being that I found “Ingredients” to be visually more pleasing and the flow of the documentary better. Below are some points/quotes I jotted down that I thought were striking and important.

From “In Organic We Trust” Documentary:
73% of Americans eat some organic food.
“Organic” philosophy: growing food mimicking nature’s model. Mode and sustainability, and not using chemicals.

The “Big 3”- cannot use/do to be USDA Certified:
Genetic modification
Sewage sludge
Irradiation

Organic foods- not necessarily more nutritious for you (depends on the study/nutrients looked at/etc.., but they DO have less chemicals and pesticides on them.

Organic farmers DO at one point or another spray, but more often than not, they are naturally occurring (and are approved by the USDA).
Use 60 billion lbs of pesticides in the US each year.

The “Dirty Dozen”- foods with highest amount of residual pesticides:
Celery
Peaches
Strawberries
Apples
Blueberries
Nectarines
Bell peppers
Spinach
Lettuce
Kale and collard greens
Potatoes
Grapes

The “Clean Fifteen“- if you do have to eat conventional, these have the lowest residual pesticide residue:
Onion
Avocado
Sweet corn
Pineapple
Mango
Sweet peas
Asparagus
Kiwi
Cabbage
Eggplant
Cantaloupe
Watermelon
Grapefruit
Sweet potato
Mushrooms

Now are 7,000+ farmers markets in the US.

From “Ingredients” Documentary:
We spend less of our income on food than any other industrial nation.

People want to know where there food is coming from. They want to know what the values are that are embedded in the food.

There are so few farmers in this country, that they’re now not listed in the Census.

Hope you find some of these points helpful. I definitely did!
xo
Carol

Great, Great Sunday!

We had a wonderful Sunday getting out and enjoying the beeee-u-ti-ful Seattle weather and getting the word out about Every Bite! We were first out in the sunshine (albeit bundled up and drinking copious amounts tea and coffee) at the West Seattle Farmers’ Market and then did an event at the West Seattle Thriftway (thank you SO much to Thriftway for their continued support).
We were so enthused and excited about people interested in doing what they can to reduce waste in the kitchen! What a fun day!

C & K

“Food Waste: Why Almost Half Our Food is Never Eaten”

K found this really interesting piece from KCRW’s “To the Point” about food waste. It’s definitely worth taking the time to listen to this. We found it quite helpful and informative. The “food waste” discussion starts around the 8:30 mark:

KCRW’s “To the Point”: Food Waste- Why Almost Half Our Food is Never Eaten

Just a couple of points I jotted down while listening:

1. We’re wasting almost 40% of the food supply.2. 1 in 6 doesn’t have enough to eat.
3. The “sell by”, “enjoy by” “eat by” dates are about freshness (ie “peak flavor”); NOT safety.
4. “We have to grow for cosmetic perfection to make a sale, and so a lot of food gets lost because of that.” (Nick Papadapalous from Bloomfield Farms)
5. Approx 20% of the grown food never leaves the farm.
6. “Food is the #1 component of a landfill.” (Doug Rauch- former president of Trader Joe’s)

And, if you have the time, they mentioned this link to help clarify these dates on products that are confusing to most of us:

http://www.nrdc.org/food/expiration-dates.asp

C & K